Reasons to Buy Real Estate Now

The “Three Reasons” below is a repost from the pages of REALTOR Magazine online, but essentially is what I’ve been saying for weeks, nay months!

The tax credits expired and everyone climbed under a rock! For a measly $8 to $18K in conditional tax credits buyers were jumping through hoops like they were handing out bars of gold. Do the math on 4% interest over 30 years on a distressed property that you bought for 10% below market. . .

So STOP listening to all the fearmongers and their media puppets screaming that the sky is falling. They’ve all got agendas. Be smart, do your homework and if it makes sense buy a home.

As a point of reference, interest rates on 30-year fixed conventional mortgages went to double digits in late 1978 and peaked at nearly 19% in late 1981. It wasn’t until early 1986 that rates dipped (briefly) below 10% again and were not permanently in single numbers until late 1990. In November of last year (2009) they were right at or just below 5%.

Three Reasons to Buy a Home Now

Stocks are up 50 percent from the March 2009 bottom. Some commodities have risen dramatically. The only asset class left in the cellar is real estate, says Michael Murphy, editor of the New World Investor stock newsletter.

As a result, Murphy is advising investors to buy now for these three reasons:

Desperate sellers: Both home owners and lenders are eager to unload a flood of foreclosed and underwater properties. Buyers with the patience to push through these complex deals can save a bundle.

Little competition: Because most people don’t have what it takes to negotiate their way through short sales and REOs, patient investors are winners.

Low rates: Mortgage rates are at their lowest level in 40 years. If you believe inflation is inevitable, lock in now.

Source: MarketWatch, Michael Murphy (08/19/2010)

Posted at REALTOR Magazine online

For more information regarding this post or other real estate information visit LARealEstateINFO.net or contact Robert Dixon at RE/MAX Palos Verdes Realty, Telephone (310) 703-1848 or email info@robertdixon.net. Content of this or any other post is presumed to be accurate but not guaranteed. DRE License #01828273

Serving the Palos Verdes Peninsula & South Bay Beach Cities, Hollywood and the Hollywood Hills, Silver Lake, Echo Park – Angelino Heights, Los Feliz, the Greater Los Angeles area and Palm Springs.

SoCal Sales and Median Price Fall in July

July sales traditionally fall from June however a nearly perfect storm of elements combined last month to produce one of the worst Julys on record. I say “nearly” because interest rates are still fantastic and we can only imagine how ugly it may have been if the cost of money had gone up as well. 

  Sales Volume Median Price
All homes Jul-09 Jul-10 %Chng Jul-09 Jul-10 %Chng
Los Angeles    8,082 6,515 -19.4% $321,000 $339,000 5.6%
Orange         3,128 2,527 -19.2% $420,000 $450,000 7.1%
Riverside      4,699 3,529 -24.9% $185,000 $200,000 8.1%
San Bernardino 3,549 2,556 -28.0% $140,000 $155,000 10.7%
San Diego      3,809 3,070 -19.4% $320,000 $338,000 5.6%
Ventura        837 749 -10.5% $375,000 $370,000 -1.3%
SoCal          24,104 18,946 -21.4% $268,000 $295,000 10.1%

With record low interest, falling prices and an increase in inventory there is great opportunity for well qualified buyers. Even with a potential double-dip in property value, the amount saved in interest should more than balance out.  As the saying goes, you make money when you purchase real estate and with the abundance of distressed properties out there and buyers’ market environment, there is plenty of opportunity.

Cash buyers are definitely is the best position to take advantage, whether changing a primary residence or considering income properties. There’s a lot of single, multi-family and vacation homes currently on the market that have the potential to cover some or all of the cost of ownership. In the best case scenarios owners will see positive cash flow. There some situations where financed income properties can produce a profit, however these are generally larger and much more complex investment s than say 3 to 10 unit properties.

Whether buying and especially if selling, know you market. Be patient and understand what constitutes the best value in your chosen area. The most important thing for a seller now is to be realistic and understand that their home may be worth much more to them than the market will bear.

My job as is to educated my clients so that they know the right deal when it comes along.

For more information regarding this post or other real estate information visit LARealEstateINFO.net or contact Robert Dixon at RE/MAX Palos Verdes Realty, Telephone (310) 703-1848 or email info@robertdixon.net. Content of this or any other post is presumed to be accurate but not guaranteed. DRE License #01828273

Serving the Palos Verdes Peninsula & South Bay Beach Cities, Hollywood and the Hollywood Hills, Silver Lake, Echo Park – Angelino Heights, Los Feliz, the Greater Los Angeles area and Palm Springs.

Southern California Home Sales and Median Price Dip in July

August 17, 2010

La Jolla, CA—Southland home sales saw their biggest year-over-year drop in more than two years last month as the market lost most of the boost from the federal home buyer tax credits. The median sale price dipped for the second month in a row, the result of a shaky economic recovery, continued uncertainty about jobs, and the expiring tax breaks, a real estate information service reported.

A total of 18,946 new and resale homes were sold in Los Angeles, Riverside, San Diego, Ventura, San Bernardino and Orange counties in July. That was down 20.6 percent from 23,871 in June, and down 21.4 percent from 24,104 for July 2009, according to MDA DataQuick of San Diego.

This was the slowest July since 2007, when 17,867 homes were sold, and the second-slowest since July 1995, when 16,225 sold. Last month’s sales were 27.4 percent lower than the July average of 26,085 sales since 1988, when DataQuick’s statistics begin. The average change in sales between June and July is a 6.7 percent decline – about one-third the drop seen this year.

Last month’s 21.4 percent sales drop from a year ago marked the steepest year-over-year decline for Southland sales since March 2008, when sales fell 41.4 percent.

“It appears some of the sales that normally would have occurred in July were instead tugged into June or even May as buyers tried to take advantage of the expiring tax credits. Some of last month’s underlying technical numbers were largely flat, indicating that the market is treading water,” said John Walsh, MDA DataQuick president.

“We do expect some sideways buying and selling to kick in, especially among homeowners who have owned for more than seven years and didn’t take out equity during the frenzy. You may have to ‘discount’ your self-perceived home value, but if the person you’re buying from has to do the same thing, it doesn’t matter. And you may get a spectacularly low mortgage rate.”

The median price paid for a Southland home was $295,000 last month. That was down 1.7 percent from $300,000 in June, and up 10.1 percent from $268,000 for July 2009. The low point of the current cycle was $247,000 in April 2009, while the high point was $505,000 in mid 2007. The median’s peak-to-trough drop was due to a decline in home values as well as a shift in sales toward low-cost homes, especially foreclosures.

Foreclosure resales accounted for 34.2 percent of the resale market last month, up from 32.8 percent in June but down from 43.4 percent a year ago. The all-time high was February 2009 at 56.7 percent, DataQuick reported.

Government-insured FHA loans, a popular choice among first-time buyers, accounted for 36.0 percent of all mortgages used to purchase homes in July, down from 38.8 percent in June and 39.2 percent in July 2009.

Last month 21.9 percent of all sales were for $500,000 or more, compared with 21.6 percent in June and 19.2 percent a year ago. The low point for $500,000-plus sales was in February 2009, when 13.6 percent of sales crossed that threshold. Over the past decade, a monthly average of 25.4 percent of homes sold for $500,000 or more.

Viewed a different way, Southland zip codes in the top one-third of the housing market, based on historical prices, accounted for 30.8 percent of existing single-family house sales last month, up from 30.4 percent in June and 27.7 percent a year ago. Over the last decade those higher-end areas have contributed a monthly average of 33.3 percent of regional sales. Their contribution to overall sales hit a low of 21.0 percent in January 2009.

High-end sales would be stronger if adjustable-rate mortgages (ARMs) and “jumbo” loans were easier to obtain. Both have become much more difficult to get since the credit crunch hit three years ago.

Last month ARMs represented 6.1 percent of all purchase loans, down from 6.7 percent in June but up from 3.4 percent in July 2009. Over the past decade, a monthly average of nearly 40 percent of all home purchase loans have been ARMs.

Jumbo loans, mortgages above the old conforming limit of $417,000, accounted for 18.4 percent of last month’s purchase lending, up from 17.6 percent in June and from 15.2 percent in July 2009. Last month’s figure was the highest since January 2008, when it was 18.7 percent. Before the August 2007 credit crisis, jumbos accounted for 40 percent of the market.

Absentee buyers – mostly investors and some second-home purchasers – bought 21.9 percent of the homes sold in July, paying a median of $220,000. Buyers who appeared to have paid all cash – meaning there was no indication that a corresponding purchase loan was recorded – accounted for 26.7 percent of July sales, paying a median $218,250. In February this year cash sales peaked at 30.1 percent. The 22-year monthly average for Southland homes purchased with cash is 14.2 percent.

The “flipping” of homes has trended higher over the past year. Last month the percentage of Southland homes flipped – bought and re-sold – within a six-month period was 3.7 percent, while in June it was 3.4 percent and a year ago it was 2.0 percent. Last month flipping varied from as little as 2.8 percent in Orange County to as much as 4.4 percent in Los Angeles County.

MDA DataQuick, a subsidiary of Vancouver-based MacDonald Dettwiler and Associates, monitors real estate activity nationwide and provides information to consumers, educational institutions, public agencies, lending institutions, title companies and industry analysts.

The typical monthly mortgage payment that Southland buyers committed themselves to paying was $1,204 last month, down from $1,251 in June, and up from $1,180 in July 2009. Adjusted for inflation, current payments are 46.4 percent below typical payments in the spring of 1989, the peak of the prior real estate cycle. They were 56.1 percent below the current cycle’s peak in July 2007.

Indicators of market distress continue to move in different directions. Foreclosure activity remains high by historical standards but is lower than peak levels reached over the last two years. Financing with multiple mortgages is low, down payment sizes are stable, and non-owner occupied buying is above-average, MDA DataQuick reported.

Source: DQNews.com

New $6,500 federal tax credit for ‘MOVE-UP’ Home Buyers

If you fit the criteria and are considering buying another house in the coming year, you might want to speed up the process and close by the June 30 expiration date.

Reporting from Washington – Take a close, hard look at the new $6,500 federal tax credit for so-called move-up home buyers that passed the Senate and House recently. Though it’s been getting second billing to the original $8,000 credit for first-time purchasers — now extended by Congress through June 30 — the $6,500 credit for current homeowners just might have your name on it.

How does it work? When will it be available?

The new credit is available now. It took effect Nov. 6, the day President Obama signed the legislation that created it. This means that if you fit the key criteria — you’ve owned and lived in your home for a consecutive five out of the last eight years, and your adjusted household income doesn’t exceed $125,000 if you file taxes singly or $225,000 if you are married filing jointly — you can claim the credit as soon as you close on a qualifying house.

That could be next week, next month or next spring. There is no “move-up” requirement in the new credit. In fact, homeowners who plan to downsize into a smaller dwelling may prove to be significant users of the credit, along with people who are moving because of employment changes.

If you fit the criteria and are considering buying another house sometime in the coming year, you might want to speed up the process and sign a contract by April 30 and close by the June 30 expiration date. Think of it this way: If the government is willing to give you $6,500 to act a little faster than you had planned, hey, why not?

Some other key features of the $6,500 credit you ought to know about:

* Whatever you intend to buy, the house cannot cost more than $800,000.

* The replacement house must become your main home. There is no requirement in the legislation that you sell your current home. You could rent it out, turn it into a second home or list it for sale later in 2010 when prices might be higher. If you plan to retain it, however, make sure that you move into the new house on the day you close so that there is no question it was your principal residence at that time.

* Like the first-time buyer credit, the $6,500 version permits a variety of dwelling types for your purchase. These include new or existing single-family homes, condominiums, manufactured or mobile homes, and boats that function as your principal residence. You cannot claim the credit if you are buying a second home or an investment property.

* The Internal Revenue Service is required by Congress to scrutinize claims for tax credits — both for the $6,500 and the $8,000 credits — far more closely in the coming months than it did earlier this year. This is because federal investigators have documented significant instances of fraud — supposed home buyers who were as young as 4, and “sales” that were fabricated. Investigators also found numerous cases of technical violations, such as purchase transactions among immediate family members, which are prohibited.

The revised rules require taxpayers to submit copies of their settlement statements (HUD-1 forms), along with their requests for credits using IRS Form 5405. Congress’ new rules also prohibit individuals under the age of 18 or who are counted as dependents on another taxpayer’s filings from claiming the credit.

* Home buyers in 2009 — those who go to closing after Nov. 6 but no later than Dec. 31 — can claim the $6,500 credit on their 2009 federal tax returns, or amend their 2008 returns. Similarly, eligible buyers in 2010 will be able to file for the credit on their 2009 returns or 2010 returns. Talk to your tax advisor regarding timing decisions.

* If you aren’t sure if you can make the deadlines established for the new credit — a binding contract by April 30 and a settlement by June 30 — do not assume that Congress will provide another extension. All the political and budgetary signs point the other way, and some of the primary authors of the credit insist that this is it — no more extensions next year. Take them at their word.

One consumer resource that answers frequently asked questions about both the $6,500 and $8,000 extended credits is http://www.federalhousingtaxcredit.com, sponsored by the National Assn. of Home Builders.

Source: LA Times.com November 15, 2009 by Kenneth R. Harney